Debra Lynn Dadd

Raw and Pasturized Milk

QUESTION:

Milk has come up in some of the blog comments this week, and I have been learning more about milk recently, so I wanted to pass along a bit of what I am learning.


First, the milk we think of as milk is not "real milk" as it comes from the cow. It is processed to kill bacteria (pasturized), remove fat (low fat and skin milk), and incorporate fat (homogenized). Real milk separates (sold as "cream top" where the cream is floating on the top), contains all it's fat, and is loaded with enzymes and nutrients that are destroyed by heat during pasturization.


In times past, milk fresh from cows fed on pasture grass was used as a cure for many diseases. Today's milk doesn't have that healing quality.


Unfortunately, it is illegal to purchase raw milk for human consumption in most states. However, we can buy cheese made from raw or "fresh" milk (cheese made from pasturized milk says "pasturized milk" on the ingredient list).


For more information on raw and pasturized milk and their health effects, go to the Real Milk website. They are campaigning to have real milk widely available in the US.


Raw milk cheeses are sold in most natural food stores. For mail order sources, see Debra's List: Food: Cheese.

POSTED BY DEBRA LYNN DADD :: DEBRA LYNN DADD :: DLD123.COM :: FLORIDA USA :: 11/25/2008 12:04 PM


COMMENTS:

I've been on the lookout for raw milk cheeses that I can buy locally, and was surprised to find that my local Costco stocks quite a few that say on the label "milk" or "fresh milk" instead of "pasturized milk."

Here are the brands I found.

At my Costco, they are divided into a case with premium imported cheese and their standard cheeses.

Premium imported cheese case:

Ford Farm Farmhouse Cheddar (England)
Papillon Roquefort (France)
Entremont Comte (France)
Auricchio Provolone (Italy)
Brillo de Treviso (Italy)

Standard cheese case:

Cabot Classic Vermont Cheddar (USA)
Tillamook Med Cheddar (USA)
Emmi Emmenthaler (Switzerland)
Kirkland Parmesean (whole, not shredded) (Italy)

I bought all of them to try and liked them all. I really feel a difference. Just a couple of slices of these cheeses and my body is completely satisfied.

Note: These do not say "raw" on the label, rather, they don't say "pasturized." They cost much less than cheeses labelled "raw" at my natural food store. None of them are labeled organic or grass-fed, but that doesn't mean they aren't. More research necessary.

I'm sure you could find many more unpasturized cheeses at a good cheese store.

POSTED BY DEBRA LYNN DADD :: DEBRA LYNN DADD :: DLD123.COM :: FLORIDA USA :: 11/29/2008 11:43 AM


Now you are talking straight to my heart! That's why the three of us living here milk (by hand) 11 goats twice a day/7 days a week with no backup - so people can have a product that is real food! We are listed on real milk and here in NE Texas, we are allowed to release raw milk from the farm with labeling that says 'For pet use only". There are other goat milk farms here in NE Texas that also sell their milk. The work is hard but in this aspect of live we do believe that 'we are our brother's keeper'.

I have had a surge of requests for does so families can get their own milk also. One of the greatest concerns I have as a 'keeper of the flocks' is the GMO feed that they get. Our government with the help of Monsanto has polluted the main feed grains for animals - corn, soy, and cottonseed. Studies have found that GMO fed lab animals become unfertile in the 4th generation - what do we have to look forward to in America? I don't have the strength or manpower to raise my own feed crops. I just wrote a friend this morning - who needs to worry about nukes - just let them eat themselves into elimination.

Organic grain is available about 150 miles from here but the cost would make the milk sell at $30/gallon - who could do that. People already squak around here at $9.00 - what will happen when it goes to $10, $11 or $12? That income didn't even support all the feed/hay/supplements that this herd needed - without the sales of soap we would have to sell it all. You won't find big, we decorated houses here, just really hard working people that are trying to contribute their portion to mankind. Believe me, there is NO profit here.

While people sit in their irovy towers figuring out how all this mess happened, we continue to plant orchards, store heirloom seeds and milk our goats. If you ever get in this area - I'll give you a glass of the 'real thing'. Also, if you have any people that need milk in this area, let them know that we are here.

roseofsharonacres.com/raw_goat_milk_benefits


Monica
www.RoseOfSharonAcres.com

POSTED BY MONICA :: ROSE OF SHARON ACRES :: WWW.ROSEOFSHARONACRES.COM :: TEXAS USA :: 11/29/2008 11:46 AM


Debra,

I just wanted to alert you to the fact, if you didn't already hear it, that Lyme disease may be transmittable via raw milk.

Best,
Sue

COMMENT FROM DEBRA: You know, that's entirely possible. But there are many, many people drinking raw milk with no ill effects. For me, the question is: does something move in the direction of health or harm? Raw milk is full of life-giving elements that are completely missing from pasturized milk. It's a matter of weighing the benefit against the risk.


POSTED BY SUE :: CALIFORNIA USA :: 12/01/2008 1:21 PM


After some research, I have found that raw cheese is actually not raw. My favorite has been Organic Valley. They have several kinds. But when someone told me it couldn't actually be raw. I emailed the company. They told me the milk is heated to 155 degrees. I don't call that raw. So I don't know what to think. I guess a national company is not allowed to sell anything just straight from the cow. So sad.

COMMENT FROM DEBRA: I will do more research on this, as I was wondering how they make cheese without heating the milk. I will go back to the source where I got this information and ask.


POSTED BY KAREN :: ARIZONA USA :: 12/03/2008 2:51 PM


Most of the cheeses we make from raw goat milk are not even heated. In the summer we can just let them process on the top of the stove after bringing in the milk. Temps have to be 90 degrees which is what it is right from the goat. For Riccota though, we bring it up to a temp of 200...the only way to make it.

POSTED BY MONICA :: ROSE OF SHARON ACRES :: WWW,ROSEOFSHARONACRES,COM :: TEXAS USA :: 12/08/2008 4:59 PM


I am part of a raw milk coop. I get raw milk and raw cream every week. My family drinks it. I have been doing this for about 4 plus years now, with no problems.

I did go to the farm and check it out too, it's a great family owned farm, they also have grass fed beef.

You can also buy fresh keifer grains from the Kefir lady www.kefirlady.com and make the best kefir, this is real kefir, nothing like what you buy at the store.

POSTED BY ERIN ELY :: ELY ORGANICS THE SOURCE FOR MIESSENCE CERTIFIED ORGANIC PRODUCTS :: ELYORGANICS.COM/ :: OREGON USA :: 12/08/2008 5:30 PM


Every state has different laws about raw milk. In many states, you can obtain raw milk through a "share" program, where you buy a share of the goat or cow and then you are entitled to milk from "your" cow. I have been drinking raw goat's milk for a few years this way (do not tolerate raw cow's milk). Raw milk has a lot of healing properties, unlike pasteurized milk. To learn more, I recommend the book The Untold Story of Milk by Ron Schmidt (available on Amazon). There is an interview with him here: realmilkaustralia.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/08/ron-schmidt-interview-acres-usa.pdf

POSTED BY MARGARET :: OPTIMUM CHOICES :: WWW.OPTIMUMCHOICES.COM :: COLORADO USA :: 12/10/2008 10:58 AM


I would love to know what you find out about raw milk cheese Debra and how and why they are considered raw. We have been purchasing Organic Valley for several years and my children eat a LOT of cheese.

POSTED BY LEAH :: MICHIGAN USA :: 12/19/2008 3:21 PM


Everything you would want to know about raw milk can be found at www.realmilk.com. They also have listings on where you can find it.

COMMENT FROM DEBRA: I agree. It's a great site.


POSTED BY CYNTHIA :: PENNSYLVANIA USA :: 12/22/2008 2:22 PM


OK. Here's what I've learned about raw cheese...

I found a great website with recipes for making raw cheese from raw milk: http://www.rejoiceinlife.com/recipes/cheeseCamembert.php.

The recipes describe two methods for making cheese with raw milk.

One uses kefir grains to make kefir, then the whey is drained from the curds to make cheese from the kefir.

The other simply allows the milk to sit at room temperature for 24 hours, at which point the milk sours and the curds separate from the whey without heat. This is called "clabbering."

Of course, to make cheese this way takes time, and you can separate the curds and whey with heat in about 10 minutes. Which is probably the motivating factor for making cooked cheese.

Prior to doing this research, all the cheesemaking recipes I had read used cooking. That's fine if you're starting out with milk that has already been cooked during pasturization. But if you are using raw milk, it is possible to make raw cheese using the old pre-industrial methods.

For each raw cheese, it would be wise to confirm if they are starting out with raw milk and then cooking it, or if they are using a raw method to make the cheese.

POSTED BY DEBRA LYNN DADD :: DEBRA LYNN DADD :: DLD123.COM :: FLORIDA USA :: 12/23/2008 6:09 AM


I think I've had real health benefits from using Organic Pastures raw butter, and they say they test their milk daily. I haven't used their cheese because it's aged and I haven't been able to tolerate aged cheeses, but want to try it again when it's once more available (the butter and cheese aren't available periodically when the cows don't produce enough milk to permit them to produce them and still have sufficient liquid milk to sell).

In the meantime I'm using Organic Valley and couldn't find any that was raw in my local health food store that tries especially hard to meet such health needs - nor at any other store locally. The Organic Valley mozzarella I'm using says "pasteurized" on the back label.

Also - my health food store told me that not all pasteurized dairy products say pasteurized and it's not required to label pasteurized dairy products as "dairy" - it's up to the manufacturer (at least not in California). The store said not to assume that dairy products that don't use the word "pasteurized" on the label aren't pasteurized, and when I checked some brands' websites I found that was true, or that some were heated to a certain degree but not enough to technically be pasteurized; one website turned out to use the low heating, which they say retains more nutrients than pasteurized. But it's not raw.

POSTED BY L.A. :: CALIFORNIA USA :: 12/26/2008 10:38 AM


This is an entry from a milk forum I belong to....there is a campaign underway to legalize the sale of raw milk. We would appreciate your votes on this...

Our issue is now Number 6 on Change.org. Just another 270 votes and we can put at Number 3. Please vote and ask your friends to vote.
Please also note Legalize Milk is in the number 1 spot for number of comments made. Thanks to you all.

www.change.org/ideas/view/legalize_milk

POSTED BY MONICA :: ROSE OF SHARON ACRES :: WWW.ROSEOFSHARONACRES.COM :: TEXAS USA :: 12/29/2008 3:33 PM


Update - I did indeed find two varieties of Organic Valley raw cheeses,and they specifically say "unpasteurized."

(They are aged at least 60 days though, while the Organic Valley cheese (pasteurized) I was using before does not say it's aged.

(I don't seem to tolerate aged cheeses well anymore, though I had no problem with them before my system became so highly sensitive.)

POSTED BY L.A. :: CALIFORNIA USA :: 01/02/2009 6:09 AM


RON PAUL Introduces Bill to End Interstate Raw Milk Ban

Please help support this - it supports small farmers and truly gives YOU freedom of choice!

On January 28 Congressman Ron Paul (R-TX) introduced HR 778, a bill “to authorize the interstate traffic of unpasteurized milk and milk products that are packaged for direct human consumption.” Under the bill, the federal government “may not take any action…that would prohibit, interfere with, regulate, or otherwise restrict the interstate traffic of milk, or a milk product, that is unpasteurized and packaged for direct human consumption solely on the basis that the milk or milk product is unpasteurized….” The bill defines “interstate traffic” as “the movement of any conveyance or the transportation of persons or property…from a point of origin in any State or possession to a point of destination in any other State or possession….” [see 21 CFR 1240.3(h)]

Passage of the bill into law would repeal the federal regulation prohibiting raw milk and raw milk products for human consumption in interstate commerce. The regulation 21 CFR 1240.61 provides, in part, that “no person shall cause to be delivered into interstate commerce or shall sell, otherwise distribute, or hold for sale or other distribution after shipment in interstate commerce any milk or milk product in final package form for direct human consumption unless the product has been pasteurized….”

The bill would not force a state to legalize the sale of raw milk by producers within its boundaries nor would it force a state to allow the sale of raw milk from out-of-state producers in its retail stores. The bill would enable consumers to enter into transactions to obtain raw milk and raw milk products from other states without the transactions being in violation of federal law.

The consumption of raw milk is legal in every state, yet its sale is currently illegal in about half the states. HR 778 would enable those living in states where the sale of raw milk is illegal—and those living in states where the sale is legal but sources are not present—to be able to exercise their legal right to consume raw milk. As Congressman Paul stated in introducing the bill, “Americans have the right to consume these products without having the Federal Government second-guess their judgment about what products best promote health. If there are legitimate concerns about the safety of unpasteurized milk, those concerns should be addressed at the state and local level.”

HR 778 has been assigned to the House Energy and Commerce Committee. An action alert will be sent out shortly to FTCLDF members on what can be done to move HR 778 forward. Co-sponsors are needed for the bill.

You may track the status of the bill by entering “HR 778” in the Search field at www.thomas.gov; be sure to select “Bill Number” instead of “Word/Phrase”.

POSTED BY MONICA :: ROSE OF SHARON ACRES :: WWW.ROSEOFSHARONACRES.COM :: TEXAS USA :: 02/10/2009 5:40 AM


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