Debra Lynn Dadd

Teflon on George Forman Grills?

QUESTION:

I am really trying to do away with all my Teflon coated cooking pans. How harmful is the George Foreman Grill? I love mine.

POSTED BY BEV ROCKEY :: OHIO USA :: 12/14/2006 8:45 PM


DEBRA'S ANSWER:

Personally, I don't use any pot, pan, or appliance with a Teflon or other no-stick finish. There are different grades of Teflon, but it's all still Teflon.

We all have to make decisions about what we are willing to use and what we aren't willing to use. It's a personal decision, based on health, budget, and various personal factors.

It took me a long time to give up my favorite shade of red lipstick. But ultimately, I'm happy I did.

Debra :-)


COMMENTS:

I have been tempted to buy a George Foreman grill, but refuse to use any pots or appliances (including breadmakers) which are lined with teflon. For years, there have been caveats about the dangers to health from the chemical. There are over 3000 high-volume chemicals in use today, most of which have never been tested, to say nothing of the 80 to 100,000 other substances in use. We have no idea of the synergy when these chemicals enter our bodies and mix together. With so much pollution surrounding us, it's tempting to throw up one's hands and say, "What the heck." However, caution rules my life. With Polar Bears and Inuits filled with so many contaminants, I vote for dispensing with the Grill.

POSTED BY SYLVIA H. :: CALIFORNIA USA :: 12/15/2006 9:20 AM


Good question. I think it could take some time before we know if these pots are safe but judging from data with human population having cancer, one can say the rate is ever increasingly alarming. So, it would be wise not to use them or if one uses these pots and pans they must check for markings if any are scratched. Always use plastic utensils to cook so as not to scratch the surfaces. Good luck. I would rather use Copper cookware but they do cost more money but they can last for coupe of lifetimes. Good luck.

COMMENT FROM DEBRA: I don't recommend using plastic utensils. I use wooden utensils on all my pots, which also don't scratch.


POSTED BY MIKET :: OR USA :: 12/19/2006 5:00 AM


Hi,
Any non-stick coating, is a PTFE (Poly Tetra Flouroethylene) derivative or something like it. It is teflon under different guises. What is alarming is how much of it is out there in places we wouldn't think to look.

I have a "DANGERS in the home" page on my website that is devoted to parrots. Teflon Toxicosis as it is called in birds is the same as what is medically called Polymer Fume Fever in humans. It kills birds and makes humans sick.

To see a partial list of items that are coated with PTFE's you can go to my website at http://www.birdscomefirst.org then click on the BIRD CARE button, then scroll down and click on the DANGERS button.

Everything from hair dryers to heaters, heat lamps to oven cooking bags to seals around oven doors are coated with PTFEs.

Even when the manufacturer says a product is safe it is not to be believed. I once purchased a heater just for the purpose of taking it apart to look for teflon (PTFE) coated components. I emailed the manufacturer to ask if their heaters had any teflon or PTFE type coatings on their product. They said no, I then photographed the parts and emailed the photos showing where the PTFE coating was.

Anyway, The question asked of manufacturers has to be more specific than "does an item have teflon in it or on it" teflon is DuPonts specific version of PTFE. If another manufacturer does not use Duponts version, they can honestly say that no Teflon is used. Ask about Non-Stck products in general to get a better answer. Keep in mind that some cookware manufacturers will only tell you if PTFE is on the cooking portion of a pot or pan. Many pieces of cookware , even if there is none on the cooking surface, has a PTFE coating on the outside of the pan that is just as dangerous. Calphalon comes to mind in this regard.
Thanks,
Bill

POSTED BY BIRDS COME FIRST :: BIRDS COME FIRST :: WWW.BIRDSCOMEFIRST.ORG :: WASHINGTON USA :: 01/04/2007 4:03 PM


For a Grill Pan (with Grill marks) you can safely use cast iron. I have a Cast Iron Grill Press (6.75x4.5) Logic by Lodge and a Cast Iron Fajita Platter Set (3-pc.) by Mr. Bar-B-Q. You can buy other sets, but this was the best for me because it is inexpensive and small. The cast iron takes a few extra minutes to heat up, and I also add a few drops of sesame oil, but it works great. Clean up with hot water and turn over to dry (so the cast iron will not rust).

PS: Love this site Debra - very very helpful.

POSTED BY MARGARET :: HELPING DELAYED KIDS :: WWW.HELPINGDELAYEDKIDS.COM :: CALIFORNIA USA :: 01/16/2007 5:00 PM


How do you fry eggs without using nonstick pot? I find a regular pot needs lots of oil and it tears the eggs apart and still sticks a whole lot.

COMMENT FROM DEBRA: I don't fry eggs myself (I eat mine scrambled or poached or hard boiled or baked) but obviously people fried eggs before Teflon. I think if you use a seasoned cast iron skillet they won't stick. Readers? Who has experience with this?..


POSTED BY DNORMAND :: LOUISIANA USA :: 01/25/2007 4:11 PM


Teflon is indeed toxic. About a year ago, the Environmental Protection Agency fined Dupont for the Teflon chemical and Dupont paid a $16.5 million dollar settlement to the EPA. Also, Dupont knew, back in the 60's that the stuff was toxic and chose to bury the evidence.

The EPA has stated that all Teflon-type products from all manufacturers are to be reduced by 95% by the year 2010, and phased out completely by 2015. As lax and absurd as the EPA can be, you know when they do decide something is "bad" there must be rather overwhelming evidence.

Teflon chemicals are found in the cord blood of newborn babies, as well as being regularly found in any sort of body-burden tests, and in fish in the Mississippi river.

Just go to the Environmental Working Group's website (www.ewg.org) and search for the word "Teflon". www.enn.com also has articles about the EPA's decree. Teflon articles can also be found at www.organicconsumers.org.

Please realize that Teflon chemicals are found in numerous places - stain-resistant carpeting, fast food wrappers (to prevent grease leaking through), Scotchguard, etc. And they are, as always, more toxic to children than to adults.

POSTED BY BREN :: COLORADO USA :: 01/25/2007 4:14 PM


Cast iron skillets are the best for cooking eggs. Make certain it's seasoned properly, then heat on low until the skillet is very warm. Add oil, butter whatever you use and then add the eggs.
When the skillet is the correct temperature (and you'll know this after a bit of experience) things will not stick. Be sure not to wash it out with detergent, but wipe out after each use. If you have to use detergent for some reason, the skillet will need to be reseasoned. It sounds like a great deal of trouble, but once you get into the routine, it's really not.

POSTED BY ELAINE :: :: WWW.FREEDOM2ACHIEVE.NET :: MARYLAND USA :: 01/30/2007 10:51 AM


We use a stainless steel pan by Kitchenaide to cook eggs. It sticks something horrible at high temperatures so you have to approach your egg cooking gently and with oil.

POSTED BY JUANITA :: ALBERTA CANADA :: 01/30/2007 11:51 AM


Yes, I agree with these. Cast iron and stainless steel is all I use. You just need to use a lot of butter.

POSTED BY MELANIE :: PENNSYVANIA USA :: 01/30/2007 5:11 PM


To the poster that asked "how do your fry and egg without an nonstick coated pan?" Here is what I do:

This will work for any pan without a non-stick surface. Heat your pan to a medium temperature. Do this first. The add oil. Here is a saying that helps me remember to heat the pan first. Hot pan, cold oil, foods wonít stick. I use Grape seed oil which has a higher viscosity so you donít need to use as much.

Fry your egg slow and low. Take your time. Donít rush. Most problems with eggs sticking and burning come from using too high of a heat setting. The eggís protein hardens to the pan before the inside is cooked.

When the egg is set on top, gently lift all the edges and then slip your spatula underneath before flipping. Cook the other side one minute more and remove from pan. If you want your egg hard in the center cook the egg until the center is opaque.

That's it :-)

Martha

POSTED BY MARTHA :: CHRISTIAN-HOMEMAKING.COM :: WWW.CHRISTIAN-HOMEMAKING.COM :: CA USA :: 01/30/2007 5:12 PM


Another way to "fry" eggs without too much sticking is what I call water frying. You heat the pan as others have noted, and when it is hot, add a small amount of oil or butter then the egg. Immediately add a few tablespoons of water. Cover with a (prefferably)glass lid until done. It works best if you lift the egg after it has cooked a bit to allow water under the egg. The egg is not crusty or rubbery like fried eggs can be. If you like crusty &/or rubbery eggs then this method doesn't work, but I like them better. The eggs are somewhat steamed.

POSTED BY CARI :: CALIFORNIA USA :: 02/02/2007 6:36 AM


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