Debra Lynn Dadd

ivory bar soap

QUESTION:

Hi, I like the mildness of Ivory bar soap but can't find any ingredients listed on their package. I called the company the representative took so long trying to find the ingredients and from the info she gave me, it seemed all natural. Can you give me more info, any parabens, etc?

POSTED BY JOAN COPPINGER :: GEORGIA USA :: 06/06/2007 5:03 PM


DEBRA'S ANSWER:

I found the list of ingredients for Ivory soap on a handmade soap website. Here's what they have to say:


Sodium tallowate, sodium cocoate or sodium palm kernelate, water, sodium chloride, sodium silicate, magnesium sulfate, and fragrance. (This information is from the Material Safety Data Sheet prepared by the Proctor & Gamble Company.)

Sodium tallowate, sodium cocoate, and sodium palm kernelate are all natural soap compounds produced from tallow, coconut oil, and palm kernel oil, respectively. Magnesium sulfate is also known as Epsom salts and sodium chloride you may recognize as common table salt. Sodium silicate is also known as soluble glass or sodium silicate glass. While the amount in Ivory soap is probably too small to be of concern, sodium silicate is harmful if ingested and in itís pure form can cause burns through skin or eye contact. Of all the mass produced commercial soaps that this writer has examined, Ivory is closest to an all natural soap with a minimum of additional chemicals. Of more importance to the consumer could be what isnít in Ivory soap. Notice that glycerin is missing from the list of ingredients. This cheapens the soap and removes one of the natural moisturizers for the skin.
I would just add that I have no reason to believe that the fragrance is natural.

I would agree with this writer though, that if you are not going to purchase an all-natural handmade soap, Ivory would be the next best choice.

Debra :-)


COMMENTS:

Hi all:
just and FYI, re; ivory soap, in terms of chemicals it may be better than some, but someone who has "scleroderma", an autoimmune illness, which means hardend skin, internally and externally, we were advised years ago. to AVOID "Ivory" soap. It will DRY DRY DRY you out which will lead to of course, no moisture and hardening. Just a tip.

POSTED BY DONNA :: MA USA :: 06/12/2007 3:01 PM


I don't know if there's a similarity, but Ivory dish detergent has a horrible effect on me. Even being near sponge that was used with it irritates my eyes for many, mnay hours, despite rinsing, and seems to adhere to the nostrils and lung tissue for 5 or more hours. It's like drinking water with a splash of Ivory. The fragrance has no nostalgic value to me anymore.

POSTED BY LAURA :: ME USA :: 06/25/2007 10:13 AM


I have been using Ivory bar soap for many years but recently have been trying to find more organic or natural soaps. I just read above that if we don't buy a handmade soap that Ivory bar soap was a good choice to use. I don't have MCS and was glad to hear Ivory bar soap would be ok. I have also used the Ivory liquid soap in my dispensers around the house but have read the ingredients on the bottle and it is not good. I went to my health food store and picked up the brand EO Hand soap. The label reads Naturally antiseptic & gentle with pure essential oils & organic herbal infusions. I bought the French Lavender scent but I think it has a strong odor and I'm not satisfied with it. Do you have a suggestion for a liquid hand soap that I would be able to purchase at a health food store that wouldn't have a scent and would be safe?

COMMENT FROM DEBRA: Dr. Bronner's, Dr. Bronner's, Dr. Bronner's! There are several scents and unscented. It's even organic.


POSTED BY LT :: NEBRASKA USA :: 06/17/2008 12:10 AM


My dad told me to use Ivory soap for my achne becuase he used it as a kid. It dries the skin, and surprisengly did help my achne a lot, though it cuased some flakyness.

POSTED BY ELIZABATH :: OREGON USA :: 11/12/2008 11:03 PM


I suggest not using Ivory soap. I tried it and it dried out my skin immediately. I would suggest using soap with skin hydrating ingredients... :-)

POSTED BY DOMINIQUE :: MINNESOTA USA :: 02/24/2009 6:10 AM


There is no one type of sodium silicate. it is made from silica (aka sand) and lye in quite widely different ratios. it reacts with water to give out some free lye. The amount of free lye it gives out depends on how much was used to make it in the first place: sodium silicate with a high lye content is very caustic much like lye itself, while with a low lye content it is only about as caustic as washing soda/soda ash. the causticity is the only reason it is listed as harmful by ingestion, it would strongly irritate your throat, but stomach acid would subsequently completely destroy it.

in the body the overwhelming majority (99.9%+) is turned back into silica and passed out as faeces, and the rest forms silicic acid, an essential trace mineral that removes soluble aluminium (which is toxic) from the body.

is it organic? no - its more like a natural mineral, albeit concentrated to a much purer form than in nature. its one of the old-fashioned chemicals that we used for a long time with no ill effects before all the new-fangled and more insidious modern preservatives were invented.

when it dries up it hardens, hardening whatever soap it is added to, which is why it is used in soap making. hope that helps

PS harmful by ingestion = lowest level of chemical hazard. that means if you EAT it (in fairly large quantities) its not good for you - but not toxic, or else it would be toxic by ingestion.

COMMENT FROM DEBRA: Hmmmm. It sounds right to me that the lye in sodium silicate when mixed with water would give out some free lye, however, when mixed with the fat in soap, it's my understanding that it combines to turn the fat into soap, and there is no free lye remaining.


POSTED BY SPIKEYI :: WYOMING NEW ZEALAND :: 04/20/2009 10:56 AM


The free lye from the sodium silicate reacts with the fat to form soap, leaving soap and a silica/very low lye silicate network, which isn't caustic in the finished product.

POSTED BY SEAN OCONOOR :: ALABAMA NEW ZEALAND :: 04/21/2009 3:26 AM


Regarding the question asked about a good natural liquid soap, I would like to recommend Wild Willow Foaming Pump Soap. The ingredients are: Distilled Water, Olive Oil, Coconut Oil, Potassium Hydroxide, Citric Acid, and Essential Oils for natural scent. This soap is amazing! Unlike detergent based foaming soaps this one coats making it easier to really clean your hands or body. It comes in the following all-natural scents: Balsam Spruce, Lemongrass, Lavender, Pumpkin Spice, Grapefruit, Peppermint, and Lavender Peppermint. All of Wild Willow soaps are handcrafted in Francis, UT. They have a great selection of bar soaps and a natural foaming shampoo too! Visit www.NaturalJoyBeauty.com and go to SOAPS under the BODY category.

COMMENT FROM DEBRA: I recently tried a foaming pump soap and loved the foaming aspect of it as well as the soap. I think you end up using less soap and it spreads easier on your skin.


POSTED BY JOY :: NATURALJOYBEAUTY.COM :: WWW.NATURALJOYBEAUTY.COM :: UTAH USA :: 04/29/2009 7:37 AM


I used Ivory for about 3 or 4 months straight (it was on sale, and I bought a bunch..haha), and I started to develop a nasty case of eczema. I went back to a natural liquid soap (Dr. Bronners), and my skin cleared up within a week.

POSTED BY KEM :: RHODE ISLAND USA :: 08/11/2009 8:09 AM


Kiss My Face olive oil soap (no fragrance) seems to be okay for me. I used to use bars of unwrapped (!) green olive oil soap from Greek stores, also Pre de Provence olive oil soap.

POSTED BY LAURA :: MAINE USA :: 08/17/2009 5:06 PM


This is the only soap that works for me, but not just as a washing soap. It works for LEG CRAMPS, and helps with RESTLESS LEG SYNDROME.

You put it under your sheets near your feet. If you get a cramp, just touch the soap, and the cramp stops. After a while the cramps stopped completely!!!

I read about it in Dr. Gott's column in the newspaper, and didn't believe it, but it was worth a try. It sounded like VOODOO or something, but I tried it. It is amazing for me!

I bought a bunch, and started using it in the shower too. When I feel achey, with fybro type pain, it seems to help in the shower, too.

I can always use moisturizer, but the help with what hurts is well worth it. I am the person who is also allergic to hydrogenated oil, and a lot of soaps still use that. So I feel that IVORY is as pure as I can find, with some added benefits!

POSTED BY CANDY EVE :: CALIFORNIA USA :: 08/20/2009 3:55 PM


Dr. Bronner makes a bar soap that is much gentler than Ivory, and even gentler than their liquid. It is the best I've ever used.

POSTED BY ELLEN :: NEW YORK USA :: 08/31/2009 1:07 PM


Green Mountain liquid soap. I have MCS and eczema and Green Mountain liquid soap is the only soap I can use on my face. I have tried most natural soaps and I break out from the majority of them. GM soap doesn't dry my face, even in winter with the heat on. No rash, no redness, no itching. For someone who is severely limited with cleansing agents, soaps, fragrances and the like, I was thrilled to find GM liquid soap. I recommend it without hesitation.

POSTED BY CHICKENMOM :: COVERED BY GRACE :: FRIDAYBEARS.BLOGSPOT.COM/ :: MISSOURI USA :: 10/05/2009 2:58 PM


Hi there, i have been using Ivory soap for years now...and hate it, it makes my skin dry and tight feeling, but everytime i try a new soap i break out in a pimple rash all over my back and chest....i have tried dove, baby soap, goat milk, cocnut and oatmeal soap, liquid lvory, and don't even ask about zest or irish soap...NOT GOOD! Any ideas of why this is and maybe suggest a soap.

POSTED BY JENNIFER :: NORTH CAROLINA USA :: 11/27/2009 5:04 PM


Try the Green Mountain soap. This is from their website:

"Liquid soap is also made from oils and caustic, just the same as bar soap, but the difference is in the type of caustic that is used. Sodium hydroxide, used to make bar soap, creates a soap that doesn't dissolve in water very fast. That is one reason why our bar soap lasts so long in the shower. But you cannot dilute bar soap with water and make it into a liquid soap. That is where the use of a different caustic comes in.

When we use potassium hydroxide rather than sodium hydroxide as the caustic to convert the oils into soap and glycerine, a soap is made that is easily dissolved in water, and that is how we make our liquid soap.

The classic oil used to make liquid soap is coconut oil. Liquid soap made from coconut oil is crystal clear, but it is also a little drying to the skin. So in our recipe we combine olive oil with the coconut oil, and we get a soap that is gentle, cleans well without drying your skin, and has all the great glycerine to help moisturize your skin as it cleans."

www.gmsoap.com/ingredients.htm I get mine from www.natlallergy.com >

POSTED BY CHICKENMOM :: COVERED BY GRACE :: FRIDAYBEARS.BLOGSPOT.COM/ :: MISSOURI USA :: 11/30/2009 5:42 AM


I use Dr. Bronner's (liquid or solid) and Kiss My Face olive soaps. Both are very natural and non-irritating (if you are sensitive to essential oils, just pick the ones that have aloe or almond instead. For example, the Dr. Bronner's peppermint and tea tree soaps have a very strong scent that even makes my eyes water at times. I use Dr. Bronner's mostly in the summer as I find it drying in the winter; KMF is ultra mild so it is better for winter or dry skin.

POSTED BY JEANINED :: DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA USA :: 12/03/2009 10:51 AM


Hello everyone: the purest soap available is actually coconut oil (whipped up into a gorgeous amber gel). Though this is not readily available, Murphy's Oil Soap (available in gallon jugs at your local hardware store)is the easily found commercial creation, with a very pleasant natural fragrance. There are NO additives! It can be used for wood floors, cupboards, woolens, silks and other natural fabrics as well as bodies!

Recently discovered, I found Savon de Marseille (French soap), made from olive oil, sometimes herbs or flower parts to be lovely, mild, and comforting. Their shape is a cube with the soapmakers stamp on it. More expensive than Murphy's, it is elegant.

COMMENT FROM DEBRA: Since coconut oil itself is readily available, why not whip up some soap yourself? Or go to Tropical Traditions, where they DO have 100% coconut oil soap.


POSTED BY LANNA SEURET :: CALIFORNIA USA :: 12/07/2009 3:55 PM


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