Debra Lynn Dadd

Iron Skillets

QUESTION:

I have read that enamel covered iron is the healthiest cookware. What about old fashioned cast iron? I was told as a child that iron skillets added iron to the food and that was a good thing. Is there anything harmful about cooking in iron skillets?

POSTED BY RUTH :: TENNESSEE USA :: 09/04/2007 4:42 AM


DEBRA'S ANSWER:

I know of no reason not to use cast iron skillets. I think they are a good choice, made of a natural, simple material.

Debra :-)


COMMENTS:

There is only one reason I am aware of to not use cast iron cookware, and that is if you have chronic Hepatitis C. Iron in any form feeds this particular and very complex virus and so it is crucial to keep iron intake as low as possible. Any medical site about Hepatitis C will caution against iron intake both from food sources and from cast iron cookware.

POSTED BY ELLABELLA TREE :: COLORADO USA :: 09/10/2007 1:45 PM


I actually have a question concerning seasoning iron skillets. I was given a new one as a gift. I'd like to start using it but it needs to be seasoned. Does anyone know if I can use coconut oil to season it with. I would appreciate any comments - thanks

COMMENT FROM DEBRA: I don't know any reason why you couldn't.


POSTED BY RS :: CA USA :: 09/12/2007 9:42 AM


I e-mailed Lodge about using coconut oil or palm oil, to season their cast iron cookware. The said they couldn't recommend the coconut oil, but the palm oil should work OK. I use Spectrum Organic Palm Oil shortening, for mine.

Donnie

POSTED BY DONNIE :: MICHIGAN USA :: 09/19/2007 5:55 AM


There's an article about cast iron cookware in the current Cook's Illustrated magazine, September October 2007. About reasoning, they say this:

"If cooking acidic foods or improper cleaning has removed the seasoning from your pan, it will look dull, patchy, and dry instead of a smooth, rich black. You need to restore the seasoning. We have found this stovetop method (rather than the usual oven method) to be the most effective way to season a cast-iron pan.

"Heat pan over medium-high heat until drop of water evaporates on contact. Wipe inside with wad of paper towels dipped in vegetable oil (hold towels with tongs to protect yourself). Wipe out excess oil and repeat as needed util pan is slick."

POSTED BY HELEN :: WASHINGTON USA :: 09/24/2007 12:58 PM


I always use coconut oil to season my cast iron pans. It works great.

POSTED BY GHN :: HAWAII USA :: 09/24/2007 1:17 PM


My most prized kitchen item is a cast iron fry pan,I have many that I enjoy but this large one is so seasoned,so big, and so old, that everything just slides around.It cooks the best pizza,warms up any left overs,firms up any pie crust,makes the best sauces and goes from over to stove top like nothing else.If there was just one item to be kept it is my cast iron fry pan.I rub it with "olive oil" extra virgin naturally. Oh yes before I forget ,do not scrub it wash it gently,and if anything is a little stuck I use a small plastic pan scrapper,do not soak your pan. It will last longer and you can pass it on as my Mom did to me.My children already have a eye on it.

POSTED BY EUPHEMIA :: HAWAII USA :: 09/27/2007 8:58 AM


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