Debra Lynn Dadd

Organic Chicken Broth

QUESTION:

After using Pacific Organic Chicken Broth I started to have a reaction to the broth. Included in the ingredients are Natural Flavors, which the company described in response to my e mail, as Plant Extracts. Due to "proprietary reasons" they would not explain what ingredients they are. Instead they asked me to give a list of things I am sensitive to and they would check if it was in the broth.

Is there an easier way to find out all the ingredients? It may be something new that I am not aware of that has caused a problem.

Their website lists all things that are NOT in the broth but does not disclose what IS in it.

Here is the website.

www.pacificfoods.com/products-broths.php

Thank you.

POSTED BY LW :: VIRGINIA USA :: 05/19/2008 12:04 PM


DEBRA'S ANSWER:

Unfortunately, the way the food labeling laws are written, flavors can be bundled together and all that needs to be specified is "natural" or "artificial."

There's nothing toxic in this broth, but obviously it contains something you are individually sensitive to.

I suggest making your own broth. In the wintertime, I make chicken broth every week.

Here's how I do it.

1. Roast a whole chicken. Just take out any innards that may be in the cavity, wash it, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. I also sprinkle with crushed celery seeds, but this is optional. I roast it at 375 degrees until I can wiggle the legs easily. Also, if you poke it with a knife, the juice should run clear.

2. I let the bird cool and remove all the meat. Then I put all the bones and crispy skin into a big soup pot with 3 or 4 carrots, 3 or 4 ribs of celery (with tops), and 3 medium onions. You don't need to clean them or remove skins, just chop roughly into big pieces. Cover with water and bring to a boil, then simmer for about an hour. Let it sit on the stove til cool. Strain and put it in the refrigerator.

3. When it's cold, all the fat will be on top. Skim it off, and then you have delicious, fat-free, homemade chicken stock. You can freeze it in "can-sized" containers, so it's like having a can of chicken stock in the freezer. Or freeze as ice cubes. It will keep 4 or 5 days in the refrigerator.

4. If the chicken flavor isn't strong enough for your taste, just concentrate it by boiling it down. I wait and add salt when I use it in cooking.

5. When you want soup, just heat and add whatever you want--bits of chicken, vegetables, noodles.

My favorite is my version of Italian Stracciatella, which means "little rags". For one serving, I put about 3 cups of broth in a saucepan and bring it to a boil. Beat one egg and have it ready. When the broth boils, quickly pour in the egg and stir gently with a fork. The point is to cook the eggs and break up the cooked eggs into "rags" that float in the broth, not to incorporate the egg with the broth. Then I top with grated parmesan cheese and chopped green onions. Yum! This is my most frequently-eaten winter lunch and very easy to make.

Debra :-)


COMMENTS:

Hello Debra

I'm responding to LW's question about sensitivity to organic chicken broth. The "natural flavors" that are added may be MSG.

This additive is portrayed as natural because according to the manufacturers it is "made from plants".

The mixture is made from "junk" vegetables that have high content of glutamate. These vegetables are boiled in a vat of acid, and the brown sludge on top is skimmed off and allowed to dry. The end product is high in three excitotoxins (thus named because they are toxic to the neurons in the brain and basically excite them to death), glutamate, aspartate and cystoic acid. This brown powder is added by food companies to almost everything.

It is also known that liquid forms (like broths) are much more toxic to the brain than dry forms as they are absorbed faster.
More and more diseases of the brain are linked to excitoxin damage, such as stroke, brain injury, hypoglycemic brain damage,s eizures and migraines.

My information comes from an excellent book by Russell L. Blaylock,MD called Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills

In my opinion you are sensitive to the MSG. Like Debra suggests make your own broth and look out for foods that have natural flavors, spices, autolyzed or hydrolyzed vegetable protein, yeast extracts, and "modified" anything as these contain MSG.

POSTED BY MARTA :: ONTARIO CANADA :: 05/26/2008 2:22 PM


Thank you for that recipe--it looks wonderful. I think I may have to go back to basics and avoid the prepared foods. It seems anything can be included in "natural" flavors and does not have to be disclosed.

POSTED BY LW :: VIRGINIA USA :: 05/26/2008 3:26 PM


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